Nutrition

Nestlé translates scientific discovery of brain development into new ‘NutriLearn’ product

Nestlé translates scientific discovery of brain development into new ‘NutriLearn’ product
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The team of scientists discovered a mixture of phospholipids, vitamins, fatty acids and minerals in breast milk that are relevant to the formation of myelin, a lipid-rich sheath that insulates and protects nerve fibers crucial for cognitive and behavioral development.

They then tested the efficacy of this nutritional blend in increasing myelin levels in healthy, full-term infants through their randomized controlled trial that revealed the nutritional impact on brain structure development as early as 3 and 6 months.

“In our scientific work, we linked several areas of our research expertise, including infant nutrition and cognitive development, before embarking on a first clinical trial of its kind. Our R&D teams have developed new approaches, such as measuring specific nutrients in breast milk, or visualizing and quantifying myelin in the developing brain.”​, says Eline Van der Beek, head of the Nestlé Institute of Health Sciences at Nestlé Research. “Thanks to our scientific advances, we now have an even better understanding of the unique components of breast milk and the role early nutrition plays in brain development.”

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Nestlé then translated this knowledge and developed a product called Nutrilearn Connect, a distinct blend of nutrients that has been clinically shown to increase myelination during the first months of life. The blend has been launched in Hong Kong under the WYETH S-26 ULTIMA brand and will be rolled out in other markets in the coming months.

myelination

Myelination is a cornerstone of human neurodevelopment that allows for coordinated communication between brain cells and networks. It is positively associated with cognitive skills during postnatal development (~6.5-16 months), as well as in children and adults, making it an important research target for strategies that support brain, cognitive and learning development.

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